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U.S. opens probe into 30 million vehicles over air bag inflators By Reuters


© Reuters. FILE PHOTO. Heavy vehicle traffic can be seen in San Diego’s Ocean Beach neighborhood, California ahead of the July 3rd holiday. REUTERS/Bing Guan

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. auto safety investigators have opened a new probe into 30 million vehicles built by nearly two dozen automakers with potentially defective Takata air bag inflators, a government document seen by Reuters shows.

On Friday, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration opened an engineering investigation into approximately 30 million U.S. cars from 2001 to 2019. On Friday, automakers were notified about the ongoing investigation.

The new investigation includes vehicles assembled by Honda Motor Co, Ford Motor (NYSE:) Co, Toyota Motor (NYSE:) Corp, General Motors Co (NYSE:), Nissan (OTC:) Motor, Subaru (OTC:), Tesla (NASDAQ:), Ferrari NV (MI:), Nissan Motor, Mazda, Daimler AG (DE:), BMW Chrysler (now part of Stellantis NV), Porsche Cars, Jaguar Land Rover (owned by Tata Motors (NYSE:)) and others.

On Sunday, the automakers either refused to comment prior to NHTSA’s announcement of their findings or didn’t immediately respond to inquiries for comment. NHTSA declined to comment immediately.

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Mike Robinson
Mike covers the financial, utilities and biotechnology sectors for Street Register. He has been writing about investment and personal finance topics for almost 12 years. Mike has an MBA in Finance from Wake Forest University.